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Tag Archives: Neil Gaiman

Around the Web

I’ve been busy writing and editing, and generally doing everything a writer should be doing, so I missed out on doing the “Around the Web” links. I have found a few interesting links the week.

One of these might be April fools jokes btw.

Jim Butcher to put Dresden books on Hiatus.

French newspaper still printing the newspaper with tech from a century ago.

This week I might be jailed for writing a book about human rights abuse.

Internet Archive adds 6000+ ebooks.

Douglas Adams made me a writer: by Neil Gaiman

Download 422 art books for free, from Metropolitan Museum of Art.

JK Rowling: Life after Harry Potter.

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Posted by on April 1, 2015 in On Writing

 

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Around the Web

pumpkinThis week has been a mad dash to finish book 1 of the Mermaid’s Curse trilogy, and come up with names for each of the three parts of the book. I’m tossing around the idea of “Curse Maker” and “Curse Breaker” for the first two. No idea about the third. “Curse Taker” maybe? I have to think about it. I’ve got one chapter that I am doing the final edit for on book 1, and five chapters left on book two.

I’ve also been working on my NaNoWriMo plots. Like usual, I will be working on two story linesskull. One main project, and one to switch to when I get stuck on the first. That seems to be the easiest way to write for me. This year it will be book 3 of the Mermaid’s curse trilogy (which I have totally plotted out, and it’s going to be AWESOME!) and book 1 of the Eternal Tapestry series. A sort of prequel to Forgotten Ones. I just haven’t decided which will be the main project, and I would love to get them both finished. But that will come about as I start writing come next month.

I’ve also been a bit busy on Instagram and Pinterest with sketches and what not to stay busy. It’s Halloween, and I enjoy drawing pumpkins and skulls, so there you go.

And now for some interesting videos/articles/etc that you might find amusing and/or informative.

The latest Authors Earnings report is live, and it’s all about KU!

Two important publishing facts EVERYONE gets wrong, by Hugh Howey

LeVar Burton reads “Go the F*ck to Sleep” at a charity live stream.

Neil Gaiman on scary stories and little children.

Japanese SF writing contest open to AI and aliens.

From Reddit: What is a science/history mystery that has been solved, but no one seems to know?

 

And just a reminder, Small Bites 1 and Prophecy by Barlight are still free. And I will be having a couple more promo’s going on next month. And you can always sign up for my newsletter here.

 
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Posted by on October 27, 2014 in News

 

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Around the Web

This month has been busy, busy, busy. My car broke down, I’ve writen another few thousand words and edited a few chapters, I overwrote some of my files, and did a couple more episodes of Story Telling podcast.  I’ve also found some really interesting things for you guys.

Books are EXACTLY like razors! a message from Hugh Howey

Neil Gaiman: ‘Terry Pratchett isn’t jolly. He’s angry’

Fiction Lag: Becoming the characters you read about. (video)

Gif of North America, and who controlled the land over time. Watch the territories move across the land.

11 sequels you probably didn’t know existed. (Hint, there was one for 101 Dalmatians.)

Mathematician and comedian, Matt Parker, asks the nine publishers participating in the auction for his book to submit bids in prime numbers and derivatives of pi.

Stephen King offers up some of his stories to film students to make films, for $1.

Stephen King interview about teaching children the art of writing.

Millions of historical (and copyright free) images posted to flicker by academics. And another collection from the British Library, also copyright free. (There are some great pictures in here. Hopefully people help tag them.)

Important life lessons learned from children’s books.

 

 
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Posted by on September 24, 2014 in News

 

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How do YOU find new books to read?

I stopped by the library today to drop off old books, and pick up a couple of new ones. Because I just watched this Neil Gaiman video yesterday about how we find our books, and what piracy really means, it got me thinking…. How do I really find new books and authors?

First, the three books I picked out:

harrisKim Harrison’s, “Into the Woods”. This is a collection of short stories from the Hallows series, and I absolutely LOVE the Hallows series. I’ve read every single book I’ve found, tracked down the graphic novels, and even own a couple. While I describe it as “A female Harry Dresden” that only scratches the surface. But, like Jim Butcher, Harrison is a FANTASTIC author who adds lots of sub plots, lots of emotion, and great twists that keep you coming back for more. So of course I got it.

briggsPatricia Briggs’, “Frost Burns”. This is another series that I’ve read all of. At least I’ve read all of the Mercy Thompson novels. I haven’t gotten into the Omega or Alpha series because really I just love Mercy Thompson. While not my favorite, Briggs is a great writer, and I really enjoy her books.

The third book is by a new author. New to me, anyway. Diana Rowland writes the “White Trash Zombie” novels. I happened upon her by browsing the “new” section at the library, and the cover looked really interesting so I picked it up. From the title I really didn’t expect anything but fluff, but I was nicely surprised. Angel, the zombie, struggles with everything a normal girl struggles with, plus her natural desire to eat brains as well.

rowlandThey didn’t have another zombie book at the library, so this time I picked up “Sins of the Demon“. The cover looked interesting, and I like her style of writing, so I thought I’d try it out.

So, the question… how did I find these writers?

I found Kim Harrison when a friend of mine suggested her book. She owned ALL of them, so I borrowed the first in the series and I was hooked. I even went to facebook and followed Harrison. She’s a really awesome person, likable, witty, and smart. She loves getting direct feedback from her readers on cover art, and other things. Win-win all over the place.

A Patricia Briggs happened to be on a shelf one day when I was sitting in a library between classes at the college. I was bored, and it was there, just sitting on a “suggested reading” shelf. It talked about werewolves, and the girl on the cover had a very no nonsense look about her… so I picked it up and started reading. I ended up checking it out and taking it home for the week. Came back for more, too.

The third one I found while browsing the “new arrivals”. I do this a lot, looking for new books with interesting covers and descriptions, and seeing if I can find anything to strike my fancy. This is one of my favorite ways to find new books since the new arrivals shelf is a miss match of every genre, including non fic, and I love all of it.

I do buy books, often ebooks, but I usually only buy new books from authors I already like. I only by print books from authors I LOVE, or from used book stores where I can find little known, or forgotten books for less then a dollar.

I have to agree with Gaiman. Free books are POWERFUL. Pirated versions are just more opportunities for people to find your books. I know the majority of new authors that I’ve taken a chance on were because of free, or really cheep books.

I’d love to be able to buy, or even read, all of the books by all of the authors I love, but that would take a LOT of money. So when I publish my own books I keep this in mind. I want more people to read my books, and maybe they will buy a few. Maybe they’ll get print copies and then give them away. Every new set of eyes on my books, every person who tells someone else how great this particular book is, that’s one more potential person who might look into my books.

So, in that spirit, if you haven’t read one of my books and you’d like to just send me a message and I will be happy to send you a PDF, or mobi file of one of them for free. Just look at my book shelf here, and send a message to crissymoss AT gmail DOT com, and I’ll get it to you shortly.

 
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Posted by on March 6, 2014 in Commentary

 

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Around the Web

sprtLast night we had a very special episode of SPRT, where we talked with Hugh Howey (author of Wool) about his new website, AuthorEarnings.com

If you don’t know what any of this is… go listen to the first 15 minutes of the show that will catch you up nicely. If you are interested then just stick around and listen to the rest of it. We ended up recording for two hours, something we’ve never done before, because the subject was so interesting, and Hugh is such an awesome guy.

Also, you might be interested to read Chuck Wendig’s thoughts on it, or Dana Beth Weinberg’s. There have been some others, but those are the two I found right off hand.

Now… back to the regularly scheduled shenanigans.

Niel Gaiman reads “Green Eggs and Ham“. Enough said.

How to Craft Tweetable Quotes That Spread Your Content like Wildfire

Hugh Howey reads his introduction to “From the Indie Side” about what it means to be an indie author.

Random Penguin India recalls, and will destroy, “The Hindus”,, an alternative history book, because a Hindu educational organization sued them over it.

Amazon releases “150 Love Stories for Every Romantic Mood”. I don’t see ‘bitter’ or ‘single’ on that list.

That’s all for now. I am going to try to make this a regular weekly thing again, as I really enjoy it. I was also thinking of doing it as a vlog…. would anyone be interested in watching a vlog with me about odd things I find online?

 
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Posted by on February 13, 2014 in News

 

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Around the Web

And I need to do another “Around the Web” post, because I have a few interesting links to share, and i don’t want to forget.

Smashwords is allowing “pre-orders” of books published through them to any platform.

KDP select is adding support for Japanese, and a couple other changes.

4 real inventions inspired by SF, a video from SciShow.

Garrett Robinson put up a fantastic formatting tutorial for print and ebooks. (there are several on his website.)

Templates for all the headers, avatars, icons and backgrounds on social media.

A great example on world building with map making.

A flow chart on how to break free of writers block.

Cliche Book Covers… Don’t do these, seriously.

Watch Neil Gaiman read his book, The Graveyard Book

Neil Gaiman discusses being disappointed by books (writing or reading them.)

The Round Table Podcast is back with an episode about “The ‘Death’ of Cyberpunk”

Joanna Penn shares her experience taking a traditionally published book back to self publishing.

 
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Posted by on July 28, 2013 in Updates

 

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Influences of the Past

I was talking to a fellow author today, and we started discussing authors we know and love. There are a number of them I love at the moment. Neil Gaiman, Kim Harrison, Elizabeth Hayden, Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman… all fantastic authors with wonderful books that drew me in, and kept me reading. Kept me looking for the next book.

When I was younger my tried and true authors were Piers Anthony and Anne McCaffrey, with a little bit of Mercedes Lackey thrown in. If you caught me with a book (which you often did) eight out of ten times it would be one of these authors.

I was a voracious reader. I have read about 80% of Piers Anthony’s, and Anne McCafferey’s books (both of who are/were prolific authors. Piers Anthony is still writing to this day, and is currently writing a book through his twitter feed.)

Thinking back, I realize that my consumption of these books had a great influence on my writing. Piers Anthony especially.

I once found myself in a discussion about his books on Reddit. Now, Reddit is an odd place, and  you can find some incredibly thought provoking commentary in there. You can also find a bunch of trolls just looking to get a rise out of people. That day I just happened to meet someone who honestly didn’t like Anthony, and when she saw my comment about what a good writer he was it pushed her buttons.

Apparently some people think of Anthony as “an old pervert”. Okay, I’ll give you one, but not the other.

Yes, Anthony writes about younger girls falling in love, flirting, sex, and centaurs and mermaids with their breasts showing. He even wrote an interesting book called “Pornucopia” which is exactly what it sounds like. Does that make him a pervert? I don’t think so. Writing erotica doesn’t make you a pervert any more then enjoying sex because, you know, it feels… GOOD!

Sex is a part of the human condition. So are the subjects of body image, love, relationships, gender equality, and age of consent. Issues that he addresses in many of his books.

I kept reading his novels because they spoke about the human condition without being preachy. He often addressed race, religion, beliefs, fear, politics, and social and political issues of all kinds, throughout many of his books. But he did it in a way that even a young adult could understand. And he did it without shoving his own personal beliefs on you (even if they were sometimes pretty obvious.)

In “Race Against Time” Piers Anthony deals with the complex idea of “conformity” and how that could cause the stagnation of society and innovation. Written in 1973, it still rings true during a time when political correctness is almost crammed down our throats. We are taught from childhood to sit down, follow directions, and learn and grow just like everyone else, and if you stand out your risk punishment for being a “disturbance in class”.

I wonder if “Race Against Time” would be publishable, through traditional means, in this decade, especially if Anthony were an unknown. Some have openly called it racist because he uses race as a device to accentuate “conformists” to “individualism”, but it was never meant to be about race.

When I say that Piers Anthony influenced my writing today, I mean that if you take the time to read between the lines of my stories you will find a deeper meaning. It isn’t just about a pretty leaf, or a scarecrow, or death. There is something behind it, some deeper meaning, even if that deeper meaning is “pay attention, ask questions, think for yourself.” Especially with my “Eversword Saga“.

I only hope that I can do half as well as Anthony, and others, did.

 
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Posted by on July 26, 2013 in Commentary, On Writing

 

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