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Tag Archives: net neutrality

What is it daddy?

Just saw this fantastic explanation of net neutrality by a nine year old:

My 9-year old son spends a lot of time online and recently came to me asking what Net Neutrality meant. I explained it the best I could. I just okay with current political events and he had a lot of questions. Had to actually look up some answers.

I recently overheard him explaining it to one of his friends, much better than I could, like this:

Pretend ice cream stores gave away free milkshakes. But you had to buy a straw to drink them. But that’s okay, because you still get free milkshakes.
One day you’re drinking a free milkshake and you look down and the guy that sold you the straw is pinching it almost shut. You can still get your milkshake, but it’s really hard and takes a lot longer.

So you say, “Hey! Stop that!” And the straw guy says, “NO! Not until the ice cream store pays me money.” And you say, “But I already paid you money for the straw.” And the straw guy says, “I don’t care. I just want more money.”

Source

Now if only we could get the GOP to understand this, of should I say to care more about this than the money Comcast is giving them.

 
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Posted by on March 10, 2015 in News

 

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Around the Web

Net Neutrality is STILL one of the most important things on the agenda right now. The FCC said yes to the internet fast lane idea. Even libraries have stepped into the fray. In their words, the death of net neutrality could KILL Libraries. Here are some ways you can still fight against it.

And also, a video that shows what Net Neutrality vrs the FCC’s “Open Internet” plan is.

Now… on to our regularly scheduled web news.

Author Earnings will have another report up in 25 hours.

Publishing is more then books.

The ISS gets and HD cam directed at earth.

Reddit answers the best way to start a new hobby, from fencing to glass blowing, and much much more.

Jim Butcher does and AMA.

Time to Reform Copyright. While he has a point, copyright is a little messed up, I might not agree with everything he says. Google books did start uploading out of print books for free on google books a long time ago. Some of them are still under copyright, but they aren’t available ANYWHERE else, so they’ve made a case for adding them to their library (as long as they don’t sell them.) The Internet Archive started adding loads of video to their archive, saving things that might otherwise disappear forever. Copyright isn’t always good. It causes things to be forgotten over time. Ignored. Lost. And what good does that do anyone?

 
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Posted by on May 18, 2014 in News

 

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The FCC Replies

Well then… The FCC asked for comments from the general public regarding net neutrality, and I sent them a letter. Here is their reply:

Thank you very much for contacting us about the ongoing Open Internet proceeding. We’re hoping to hear from as many people as possible about this critical issue, and so I’m very glad that we can include your thoughts and opinions.

I’m a strong supporter of the Open Internet, and I will fight to keep the internet open. Thanks again for sharing your views with me.

Tom Wheeler
Chairman
Federal Communications Commission

Tom Wheeler. The guy who use to be a lobbyist for Comcast. The guy who has consistently been working for the ISPs to let them do exactly what they wanted to do. And he has “always been a strong supporter of the Open Internet”?

There was another article not that long ago that said this same Tom Wheeler wanted to just give the ISPs their way, and if that didn’t work out, THEN they would finally reinstate net neutrality. That’s what they are calling the Open Internet. The ISPs idea of the Open Internet means they can do basically whatever they want.

*Insert Expletive Here*.

 
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Posted by on May 2, 2014 in On Writing

 

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My letter to the FCC

I’ve talked about the attack on Net Neutrality a lot lately, and the FCC just opened up an email specifically for letters about this very subject.

Openinternet@fcc.gov

Here is my letter. Feel free to copy and send it, or edit it as you like.

To the FCC:

The internet has been one of the most inspiring places for people to create and develop new technology, new businesses, and reach more people then ever before.

Bands can now sell their music directly to their customers. Authors are now making a living off writing, not just a pittance. Film and game designers are collaborating from many countries. Businesses are expanding, and new businesses are developing, all because of the web.

In the modern USA it is nearly impossible to get a job without access to the internet. Many companies do not accept applications unless you go to their website. You can’t get bills from some companies unless you have an email. Even ordering a pizza is sometimes difficult unless you are online.

Just think what this world would be like without the internet. How much progress would be undone? How many people would be out of work, or forced to commute again? How much business would be slowed because people had to travel from one end of the globe to another?

The internet should be classified as a common carrier, just as the phone was decades ago. ISP’s should be held accountable for the billions they took in to upgrade services then never held up their end of the agreement.

If we want our country to grow and thrive we need a free and open internet. We need it out from under the monopoly that has been crushing it for so long. We need an updated infrastructure that will let technology bloom like it never has before.

Once the government decided to create the international highway system, and that led to the biggest boom in our economy, ever. We had jobs, and those jobs allowed people to buy more, create more, and go farther. If the ISP’s aren’t willing to do the same thing with our internet, then the government should. It would show the people that our government is for the people again, not just for big business.

 
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Posted by on April 26, 2014 in On Writing

 

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Internet “fast lanes”?

The FCC just announced new rules that will make “internet fast lanes” a reality.

What is an internet fast lane? Imagine all you favorite web content is still out there, but unless that website pays the web services extra they get slowed down. Netflix is already seeing this. They are paying Comcast and Verizon blackmail money so that their subscribers don’t get their content slowed way down. Netflix had to raise the prices of new members because of this, and while $10 isn’t a huge raise the point is they never should have had to do this in the first place. Black mail is ILLEGAL!

What about Youtube, iTunes, or your favorite streaming site? What happens when they start throttling downloadable content like games, and music? A lot of these places are free. What happens when they aren’t anymore because ISP’s are double charging everyone?

The marvelous thing about the internet was that it leveled the playing field. People who created finally had a way to sell their creations without growing through middle men. We could design our own books, games, movies, and music, upload and sell it directly to the people who wanted to view it. Or put it up for free and let it spread via word of mouth.

Now picture that road barricaded unless you spend a lot of money to get that same content put out.

Net neutrality has already been killed. But we still have some options. The FCC is going to be voting on weather or not they should be letting this through, and not all of the chairmen agree. Let your voice be heard. Let them know what you think they should do.

Write an email to tom.wheeler@fcc.gov and tell him how you really feel about him doing this. He’s the guy directly behind this, and he’s getting paid a lot by Comcast and other ISP’s to do this.

Even better, copy your email and send it to ALL of the leaders of the FCC. Let them know how you really feel about it all.

At this point I’m worried that Google and the fibre they bring will be the only chance for us to get out from under the foot of the ISP’s who refuse to upgrade their systems. But Google can’t spread the fiber fast enough, and many cities that want to install it themselves can’t. Seattle tried and Comcast bought the mayoral election to kill that plan. They are doing it in other cities too.

Everyone benefits from a free and open internet. It should be classified as a common utility, not a luxury. Tell the FCC to do that. Too many of us make our living by using the internet. Stand up for your rights to make that living without barricades.

The petition to stop this:

More information:

http://www.reddit.com/r/technology/comments/23t7qj/why_comcast_will_be_allowed_to_kill_net/

http://www.esquire.com/blogs/news/comcast-twc-chart

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/24/technology/fcc-new-net-neutrality-rules.html

 
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Posted by on April 23, 2014 in News

 

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Why does net neutrality matter?

There are certain things a person, or any animal, needs to survive. Food, water, and shelter. A place to call home.

In the same respect, an economy, and a country, has things that it also needs to survive, and even thrive. Those things change over time as technology and the world evolves, but they are necessary just the same.

Before the invention of the telephone, people, and corporations, were limited in their ability to expand. They had to wait for correspondence through the mail, or short telegraphs. Or, travel, which at the time could take months to cross the ocean. Everything moved slower out of necessity.

After the invention of the telephone there was a period of adjustment. People understood the significance, but control of the phone and the lines involved, were regulated by one company, Bell. They, along with the help of the FCC, made it difficult to expand the network. Devices that were the precursors to faxes and modems were not allowed to be connected to the lines until the courts forced them to allow it. Bell wanted every device to be made and rented to consumers by them.

In 1974 the US Department of Justice filed an anti trust lawsuit against AT&T. It wasn’t until 1985 that they agreed to a settlement and broke up the monopoly.

They realized that the monopolistic tendency of Ma’Bell to suck every cent they could out of the industry was stiffling innovation, and technological advancement.

Now we have a similar situation. Companies and individuals depend on the internet for sales, marketing, communication, and entertainment. We get most of our content online. Indie creators have used services like KDP and youtube to promote and expand their reach.

All of this has been made possible because of “Net Neutrality”. Something a court ruling just overturned, and we no longer have.

Net Neutrality means that the internet provider is providing a service. Like a water company provides water. You can do whatever you want with the water, connect as many hoses as you like. Boil it, fill a pool. Freeze it and make an igloo. It doesn’t matter. You are just buying a service.

But internet providers are closely linked with cable companies, which means the increase of streaming services like Netflix and Hulu is a decrease in cable. Companies like Comcast and Verizon have been fighting for the right to charge users more to use these streaming services, thus making their $70 a month cable bill look more appealing.

This time it isn’t the FCC that is holding up the monopoly. It was a supreme court judge that said net neutrality wasn’t necessary because if you didn’t like your service you could just go to a different company. He failed to recognize the fact that many people do not have a choice in service providers, and even when they do the companies often work together to keep prices high. Only Google Fiber has given any real compatition

But don’t think this will stop with cable and netflix. Indie music, books, and cames also give competition to established corporations, and they will be looking for ways to use this to their advantage. What happens if youtube, or amazon get slowed down, or even blocked to make other publishers happy?

We simply don’t know how this is going to effect us, but one thing has always proven itself to be true: as long as monopolies hold onto the old ways innovation will be difficult, slow, or even non existent.

What can you do? Sign this petition. Spread the word. Send a letter to your congressmen, and the FCC. Email your representative. CALL THEM. Make some noise.

This is incredibly important. We are thriving because we have access to this marvelous technology. Don’t let them destroy it.

 
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Posted by on January 16, 2014 in Commentary

 

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